Rising Outages Mean Days Without the Internet Could Soon be Reality

By Paul Gampe

Most of us experience internet outages on an individual — and generally irregular — level. Perhaps we’re unable to check in with friends on social media, stream a movie or pull up a recipe for that evening’s dinner. The inconvenience is frustrating, but the impact is limited. 2016 may not have been when many people first became aware of the vulnerabilities featured in the underlying routing architecture of the public internet, but it remains a watershed year where these vulnerabilities became such prominent and repeated targets. This yielded a wider impact on communities and businesses from large-scale internet outages, caused by deliberate and malicious cyber-attacks. As industries, services and governments have grown more reliant on the public internet, malicious characters…

SDN’s Place in Smart Cities

By Jay Turner

Seoul, South Korea’s “Global Digital Seoul 2020” initiative is a four-year plan to deploy enough free WiFi to cover the entire city, and that includes buses and trains. The free WiFi portion of this initiative is actually scheduled to be completed by 2017, but the overall plan extends well beyond WiFi. Seoul is planning to be a leader in smart city technology, which includes projects like real-time parking availability. LinkNYC, our country’s best-known city-wide WiFi project, doesn’t have goals as ambitious as Seoul’s project, but it’s still a mammoth. LinkNYC aims to have 7,500 WiFi kiosks installed across the city, which will provide gigabit Internet (and free phone calls) to anyone who wants it. The speeds aren’t 5G, the range…

The State of SDN – Have We Reached the Tipping Point?

By Jay Turner

The notion that we’re on the edge of widespread SDN (software-defined networking) adoption has been rumored for years, now. It seems there’s always a new report on when SDN will catch on and how big of a success it will be. While these reports are usually over optimistic, they have me thinking about when the tipping point of SDN will be reached – when the momentum and notoriety the SDN movement is gaining will finally pass the threshold separating isolated experimentation from widespread adoption. There have been innumerable reports predicting that SDN adoption is inevitable and will be inextricably integrated with the future of networking. IDC published a study of the SDN market earlier this year and predicted a 53.9%…

Console and AWS: A Partnership Built on Direct Connections

By Kevin Baker

The enterprise world is increasingly moving in a cloud-first direction. On its own, this trend is absolutely a positive step forward. But, the fact that it’s happening over a public, unsecure, unreliable Internet should concern everyone. Leaving business-critical traffic and apps vulnerable to potential attacks is a risk that today’s enterprises should not and cannot take. With direct connections, they don’t have to. In order to provide enterprises and SaaS providers around the world with easy-to-implement, cost-efficient direct connections, Console has always strived to form lasting, valuable relationships with cloud services. We work with the world’s leading cloud-computing providers, like Amazon Web Services (AWS), to facilitate secure, reliable, high-performance network connections between enterprises and their mission-critical partners. Enterprises look to…

Relics of the Past: Why the Principle of Least Privilege Needs a Modern Rethink

By Brad Mandell

IT might live at the bleeding edge of innovation, but one of the fundamentals of modern IT security is still rooted in the early 1970s: the Principle of Least Privilege. When it was first introduced, the idea was that, to prevent breaches, every user should be given the minimal level of access to their organization’s IT infrastructure necessary to do their jobs. No more, no less. And, in theory, it made sense – limit the number of people who can reach your most sensitive data, and you limit your exposure to a breach. But, the Principle of Least Privilege was born at a time when the first floppy disks and microprocessors were barely off the assembly line. IT today is…